Rescue Task Force is a program of Life Charities, Inc. An IRS recognized 501(c)(3) charity.

EIN 27-3504467Rescue Task Force is a program of Life Charities, Inc. An IRS recognized 501(c)(3) charity. Videos Clean Water Medical Clinics Literacy Programs Disaster Response

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Rescue Task Force Donation Information
RTF: Start of Clinic Construction, Moskito Coast Jungle
eTown E Chievement Award Gary Becks Rescue Task Force
Rescue Task Force -- Thank You Donors and Supporters
Rescue Task Force - Water Filter Project
FT Entrega Sillas 3 Gaby Sosa Lunes 19 Agosto
FT Entrega Sillas 2 Lilil Diaz Martes 13 Agosto

Clean Water Projects:


Rescue Task Force Clean Water Filter Project For Honduras Jungle Villages. Individual family water filters for Miskito Indian jungle villages in Honduras.


This much needed project is the distribution of individual family water filters. Clean water is the key to breaking the cycle of worm and parasitic infestations present in 100% of the villagers in the jungle areas we visit. Our RTF medical teams treat the infestations but long term remedy requires clean water.


Individual family water filters are replacing our current mechanical water pumps. Existing pumps are wearing out too soon from overuse and in some areas the water table has dropped beyond the reach of the pumps.


The filters are rated to provide for a family of four for two years. The technology is well established with a manufacturing plant in Tegucigalpa, Honduras as well as Nicaragua and Cambodia. The resident Health practitioner at our clinic in Uhsan reports 90% decrease in diarrhea since introduction of the filters in that village.


Treating worms and parasites medically is good for short term care, however long term usage often causes cirrhosis of the liver. Heart worms are very commonly water-born in less than sanitary jungle conditions.


Children under five years of age are the most vulnerable to death from water born pathogens. To most Americans diarrhea is an inconvenience. In jungle villages it can be a death sentence. The very young and the very old often die of dehydration brought from diarrhea that is caused by waterborne pathogens in unsanitary water.


This program runs in concert with our clinic facility construction projects. The water filters will be sold to villagers for about US $2.00. The cost is about $75.00 with shipping and RTF will subsidize the cost to cashless villagers whose economy is based on barter.


Medical Clinics:


Rescue Task Force establishing/maintaining Medical Clinics & medical support projects: Delivering medical teams to remote, deep jungle villages in Honduras and the construction of full service medical and dental clinics that are giving local Moskito Indian villagers their first ever full time medical care.


We also deliver millions of dollars worth of overseas shipping containers filled with wheelchairs, pharmaceuticals, medical and dental equipment to our projects in Cambodia, El Salvador and Honduras. The cargo is donated by manufactures; we pay the freight and oversee the distribution to the end user recipients.


In addition to the clinic construction and water filter teams, throughout the year we field volunteer medical missions deep into the jungles of Honduras. These teams are made up of U.S. and Honduran lay people, doctors, and dentists.


Our first three medical facilities in the jungle of Honduras’ Miskito Coast are completed. After building in Uhsan and Lacunca we pressed further into the jungle to the village area of Sih Honduras, a region on the Coco River that divides Honduras and Nicaragua. Working with the Honduran Ministry of Health we have now completed construction of that facility which brings full time medical service to people who have NEVER had any care, of any sort.


This clinic facility is an International Project in that it also serves about 1,000 people of Nicaragua.


As with our previously constructed clinic sites; this one serves about 2,000 Honduran Miskito Indians. Clinic sites are villages selected by locations that are on river ‘hubs’ and are villages accessible to isolated families with one day travel by dug-out canoe vs. the current six days of paddling canoes to medical help.


A requirement of a given site location is that the local villagers commit to the vast volunteer labor required for construction. RTF provides the finances for the construction. The local populace provides all labor: Harvesting and planing wood for lumber, dredging sand from distant creeks for fabrication of cement blocks and the physical construction.


RTF equips the clinics with mechanical equipment such as hand-crank O.B. tables, dental chairs, furnishings, sinks, and all of the medical instruments and tools. Once all is ready the local Ministry of Health then provides the resident full-time, professional medical staff.


Immediate future projects in La Moskitia, Honduras include construction of the next clinic in concert with the Ministry of Health’s priority list and ‘outfitting’ and equipping two medical clinic facilities that have been constructed by the Government of Honduras, but have no equipment. (“No equipment” means that the facility has only: a roof, four walls, and a wooden chair.)


Measurable Results: Life where there was death! In Uhsan, where our first clinic has been operation for the past year, the resident ‘doctor’ sees about 5 consults per day. When we first came to that area our team physician treated over 300 patients during a several day visit. In Uhsan, a farmer was recently bitten by a poisonous snake. Today, because we built a clinic in that village, that farmer is alive and providing for his family.


In the village of Kruta (a possible future site) a same snake bit a relief worker some weeks ago who was passing through the area. That person died. Our clinics improve lives as well as saves lives lives.


Nadia, an eleven year old girl, lives in the jungle village of Lacunca. Nadia came to one of our day clinics for help with her “stomach problem”. Nadia, we found, had an umbilical hernia. Carrying water, doing stoop labor in the fields, and washing clothes in the creek – all of the chores that children do, were exacerbating her problem.


To work she had to hold her umbilicus (belly button) to keep her intestine from protruding out. The umbilicus has developed a four inch external sack. Eventually the hernia would strangulate and then in about 72 hours little Nadia would die a horrid death from peritonitis.


Today, because of our clinic project Nadia is well. The hernia is repaired she leads a perfectly normal life.


We also deliver millions of dollars worth of overseas shipping containers filled with wheelchairs, pharmaceuticals, medical and dental equipment to our projects in Cambodia, El Salvador and Honduras. The cargo is donated by manufactures; we pay the freight and oversee the distribution to the end user recipients.

Literacy Programs:


Rescue Task Force operates twenty-three literacy centers for women in Afghanistan: Bringing the gift of basic literacy to an entire society. In one school we have three generations of Hazara women attending classes, grandmother, daughter and grand-daughter.


A village male elder said of the schools: There is a difference between blind and healthy. The one who is illiterate is like blind, so we very like to have this school.

Tribal Elder


"I am a woman. I am not too old but I have seen many difficulties...All the members of the family work. I cut the grass for cows, cook meals, wash clothes, and prepare school supplies for my brothers and 100s of jobs like this...My life is completely repeated over everyday till this moment. The day which I hear in my village has started literacy center . . . is the best day of my life. I hurried and told my name to the teacher and take a book and look at the pictures of the book from the first till the end. I requested from God to help me to read the letters of the book."

Speech by 18 year old, Ghazni Province


RTF has graduated over 7,000 ladies from our centers with 2,000 of those graduates going on to higher learning and becoming nurses, teachers and workforce professionals.

Disaster Response:


Rescue Task Force is a 9-1-1 responder to global man-made and natural disasters – usually responding within hours of a disaster striking. Upon arriving into a disaster area the initial response team does local purchasing and convoys relief supplies into hazardous zones.


The teams provide immediate assistance and conduct a comprehensive needs-assessment. RTF teams coordinate the receipt and distribution of bulk relief supplies that will be following behind them.


Working with local service providers and governments, RTF provides ongoing relief to communities that have been identified and determined to be in the most need. RTF teams typically work in remote, difficult to access isolated villages and hamlets that are overlooked by conventional relief providers.


Sometimes the impossible takes us a few days…



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